Reduce Your Risk Of Heart Attack And Stroke

UNDERSTANDING THE RISK

Heart Disease is the No. 1 cause of death for men and women in the U.S. And, Stroke is the No 3 cause. This means it’s important for you to do everything you can to reduce your risk and prevent a heart attack or stroke.

Learn about the things that increase your risk and take steps to make changes. Even if you’ve already had a heart attack or stroke, it’s not too late to improve your health and prevent future damage to your heart or brain.

KNOW YOUR RISK

Your risk of a heart attack or stroke increases if you:

* have high blood pressure

* have high cholesterol

* have a family history of heart attack, stroke, or heart disease

* have had a heart attack or stroke

* are overweight or obese

* have diabetes

* smoke

If you’ve already had a heart attack or stroke, then you know it’s important to prevent having another one in the future. Lifestyle changes and taking medications can reduce your risk. It’s important to make a treatment plan with your doctor and stick to it.

Personal and Close to Home ~~~
This past weekend Saturday and Sunday consecutively two of my dear friend’s husbands had ‘heart attacks’. It was very scary there for a while for all of us. These men are 55 and 58 (not very old in the scheme of things) One was dealing with extremely high blood pressure; the other, this was his 3rd heart attack and he had also undergone open heart surgery about 3 years ago. Both were diagnosed with a blocked coronary artery (arteries that service the heart).

What Happens

1. Over time, high blood pressure can damage your artery walls Sarms for fat loss and cause them to harden and thicken.

2. Plague, which consists of cholesterol, fat, calcium and other substances, can build up in the damaged lining of an artery. Over time, it narrows and blocks the artery. As this plaque continues to build, the artery becomes narrower, harder and less flexible. This reduces blood flow to the artery.

3. Eventually, the plaque cracks. If this happens, platelets, which are particles in the blood, clump together on or near the crack and can form a clot, thus cutting off the blood flow to the heart or brain – thus leading to a heart attack or stroke.